Category Archives: Music

Bonesaw Podcast – Episode 54: Exhumed’s Matt Harvey Returns

Death metal destuctionista Matt Harvey returns to our show to talk about Exhumed’s new album Death Revenge, plans for his Death-inspired band Gruesome, and much much more.

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Harp House Episode 23 – Making Sense of Michael Rubin’s New DM48 Tuning

In this episode, Connor and Michael break down a new chord tuning for the DM48. Make sure to bust out your pencil and paper for this one!

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Valence – He Tried to Kill Me With A Forklift

Complex melodies combined with exceedingly rigorous fretwork manifest  into a track from New Rochelle progmasters Valence that features a title just as ridiculous as the music that follows it.

He Tried to Kill Me With a Forklift.”

The single, released August 18 will take its true form Friday when Decibel magazine premieres the music video.

“Forklift” features chuggy yet harmonious overtones coupled with superb shredding, a slight nod to Iron Maiden’s “Wasted Years,” and a thick rhythm section pulling it all together. While the track is a heavy six-minute instrumental, the constant changes and revolving door of time signatures keeps one embedded in its near-bloody purpose.

“This was actually one of the first songs we’ve written that’s not part of a larger piece of music (like a concept album), so the focus was definitely riffs and groove rather than any particular concept, unlike our previous releases,” says guitarist Michael Buonanno, who adds that that reason alone was why Valence felt “Forklift” was best served as a standalone.

Although a bunch of prog dudes never actually did get into a forklift fight in space as Valence’s Bandcamp page insinuates, the title actually references a running gag from the cult sci-fi meets Jim Henson-like verbal jousting show Mystery Science Theater 3000.

“It originally comes from the “Fugitive Alien” episode if you want to dig it up,” Buonanno said. “We wanted the title to fit the vibe of the song: kinda quirky and funny but also bad ass, and once that [Mystery Science Theater 3000] came up, we couldn’t name the song anything else.”

In addition to the mayhem and math-metal madness, Valence will also open for Scale the Summit and Angel Vivaldi on November 10 at the Kingsland in Brooklyn, NY. To help mitigate the buzz – and grow their fanbase, the four-piece is enlisting the help of Dewar PR.

“That show is going to be off the hook,” Buonanno said. “We were bugging out when we received the email.”

Ministry, Death Grips at the Electric Factory

Me, Jesse, Doug, Nick, and Andrew used a billing of both of these awesome bands as an excuse to make a road trip to Philly.  On the way there we did some random things such as eat cheese steaks at Gino’s and visited the famous Bomb Bomb bar.

At around 7:30, we got to the venue for the first band of the night.

Death Grips

I was very excited to see Death Grips finally after knowing them since Exmilitary came out. Doug and Jesse were both very excited being big fans as well (with them being Jesse’s favorite band). They did not speak a word during the entire set, knocking out over 20 songs in 45 minutes.

They didn’t run out of energy for a second and played so many great songs such a “Takyon,” “Guillitine,” “No Love,” “I’ve Seen Footage” and “Fever. ” They stole the show and even Andrew – who hates hip hop liked the set.

Ministry

Ministry’s set was decent but could have been better.

They played mostly stuff from the Last Sucker and onward – an era I’m not a fan of.  However, they did sound pretty awesome when playing later songs like “NWO,” “Just One Fix” and “Lies, Lies, Lies.”

We left an hour into their set due to being so far from home in addition to them not playing  a lot of their classic tracks (seriously no “Stigmata”????).

All and all, Ministry did fine but Death Grips owned the night!!

Why Nuclear Hatred Broke Up

Earlier this week, guitarist Robert Orr and myself decided to disband our crossover/thrash metal band Nuclear Hatred (formerly Zamboni) of seven years.

For six of those seven we were known as Zamboni, a punk/thrash powerhouse that never took itself too seriously. In that time we released a demo, two EP’s, a live album, and our one and only album. Those were good days. Thanks to the good people at the Meatlocker and some other local bands that we consider to be dear friends of ours, we built up a small scene in the New Jersey area, pulling together some great shows such as Midian’s one and only reunion show, a Cancerslug show that is now known as “The Jersey Massacre” on their YouTube page, and our five “Thrash Bash BBQ” events. If we needed help, another band was there to fill in on drums or help set up and promote a show. Everyone was going to everyone’s shows. Everyone was buying everyone’s merch. All the bands were looking out for each other. It was clear: We weren’t just making music, we were cultivating a community.

Fast forward to 2016. A week after we finally released our debut album (which was heavily promoted through Clawhammer PR and even got the attention of Zero Tolerance magazine and a few South American compilations), the suits came calling. The Frank J. Zamboni Corporation sent us a cease and desist letter telling us we couldn’t use the name Zamboni as it was copyright. While that is probably not true as Zamboni is a very common Italian last name (therefore impossible to copyright, and if it just so happened to be MY last name it would have made even less sense), we didn’t have the money to take them to court (In addition, we had copywritten our demo years back and if there actually WAS a copywright under that name, it would have gotten pinged back and we would have known to change the name on the spot). After pleading with law firms to find a loophole without changing our name and killing our long-overdue momentum, it seems that these ridiculous cases are simply done just to waste money and ruin a person financially at the company’s expense. We had no choice but to change the name in haste to Nuclear Hatred- the first song we ever wrote as Zamboni.

While we liked the name for a song and possibly album title, we hated it as a band name. We also hated the fact that we couldn’t really get booked anywhere unless we rented a place and booked the show ourselves (with one exception as a really wonderful human booking shows out of her parent’s Staten Island basement). Everyone was suddenly playing a very generic form of thrash or another genre and getting the booking we felt we deserved as we had accomplished much more than any of them.

And as for our so-called “community?” After all the help, support, and attempts to really create something over the years, not once did they offer us a slot on a show or ask what they could do to help us regain our lost momentum in our time of need. It was clear to us that there was no unity any longer. Everyone was only in it for themselves at this point and we were “just another band/occasional promoter.” The only times we would ever get any booking-related questions would be if we were booking a show and someone asked to be on it. When it came to even going to shows, there was no longer any excitement. You never felt like anyone in the venue cared nor that anyone playing was really going to make it – especially with the horrid shape that the music industry is in. People only showed up to shows for the headliner, and they “couldn’t afford” a local band’s t-shirt but just so happened to have the money for several overpriced drinks. The NY/NJ scene had died and anyone clinging to the idea that there still is one is a complete denier.

When it came to our writing, even the musical styles were changing, straying further away from crossover and thrash metal in our songwriting. The lyrical content for album two was to be much darker and revenge driven against the machine. We were simply too bitter and burnt out to really focus on our craft. Even routine practices were becoming a chore, happening less and less. We had plans to do some splits and EP’s, but they never materialized and we were given the runaround from people involved.

In January, we played our last show, although we didn’t know it yet (it also was the last SI basement show, oddly enough). Throughout the year we couldn’t squeeze out many practices due to scheduling and sometimes just not really having a drive anymore. Plus, we were listening to lots of other genres of metal and music altogether. I started a love affair with doom metal, gangster rap, and psychadelic rock. I also fell head-over-heels for stand-up comedy, voice acting, painting, podcasting, and the occasional game of Magic: The Gathering. Thrash in a dead scene that could care less about what I was doing seemed like a moot point.

After months of this, Orr and I sat down and had a phone call roughly a week ago. After about 30 seconds into the call, we both had the same idea: stop beating the dead horse and bury it. We both didn’t want to be there anymore. The music wasn’t fun, and the scene and our community were gone. Seven years was a good run, and we were too heartbroken over all of our hard work repeatedly being stabbed in the back to allow any of it to continue. Plus our lives were pulling us in different directions.

While we plan on still being musical for the rest of our lives, we’re not sure where the roads will take us. Until then, thank you for being a part of this journey and I hope to see you in the coming years. Hopefully the scene will sort itself out and there will be a community once again, but for now, there is much work to be done.

 

Dark Tranquillity at the Chance

After being a fan since high school, I was excited to finally get the opportunity to see Dark Tranquillity when they were announced for the Chance Theater.

As the days got closer it became more of a debate with money being short at times and car trouble (which turned out to be nothing) in the weeks leading up to it but luckily, everything turned out fine when it got close. After school I headed to the venue to finally catch the Swedish melodeath legends.

Striker

First main band on was the traditional metal throwback Striker. These guys will awfully generic and weren’t very good at all. They just felt like a weaker version of the bands they were paying tribute to and made me long-await Warbringer.

Warbringer

Second on were retro thrash titans Warbringer. I had not seen these guys since they opened for Iced Earth in 2012, so it was refreshing to see them once again. They didn’t play for long, but they made the most out of their minutes.

Dark Tranquillity 

At around 10:30 p.m. it was time for the headliners. While I honestly wasn’t a big fan of their latest album Atoma, I didn’t mind anything they played live from it due to their good performance. I was also glad I got to hear a good amount of classics such as “Wonders at Your Feet,” “Mundane and the Magic,” “Misery’s Crown,” and my favorite track, “Terminus.” Not a dull moment went by at that show and it was one of the best I’ve been to at that Chance in awhile.

 

 

 

 

 

Harp House Episode 21: SPAH and the Youth Presence

Frontera shares some of the huge successes of SPAH, mainly focusing on the youth presence and how it made the convention outstanding. This episode features interviews with Matt Henderson, Kersi Wisecarver, and David Berntson.

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Harp House: Episode 19 – Sam Friedman: The Harmonica and Other Instruments

by Connor Frontera

An Injury forced Sam Friedman to explore other instruments, and he found his new love in the harmonica. In this episode, Friedman talks about his harmonica beginnings, and the two trade ideas about incorporating the harmonica and other instruments into your playing to create enjoyable music.

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My Experience at MDF 2017 – Part 4: Sunday

by Anthony Carioscia

As always, Sunday was the last day of Maryland Deathfest like and the line up was killer. We walked down after getting food and I got there for the first band I wanted to see: Angelcorpse.

Angelcorpse

I had seen Angelcorpse last year at this fest and they were again heavy and intense. Vile and unrelenting with their aural assault, a great act to start the day.

Behexen 

I went to get some dinner and then came back for Finnish greats Behexen. I watched them from a high-up area with my friends Nick and Cheyenne. The atmosphere they invoked was like none other and were one of the bands that owned the day with their blistering intensity.

Oranzzi Pazuzu

Next up was experimental black metal group Oranzzi Pazuzu. The three of us watched them set up and we knew we were in for a different kind of band. We were all fans since around 2014 and what we got was a very good and jazz-like jam set, which really shook up the day in a good way.

P.L.F

I then went over to Soundstage to catch the Texas grind masters, P.L.F. They put on a great energetic punk show, making for a great warmup for the next act.

Iron Lung 

Next up were one of my favorite powerviolence bands, Iron Lung. They played a crushing set, although I didn’t see all of it because I wanted to catch some Akercocke at Rams Head.

Akercocke

Akercocke were one of the bands I wanted to see the most and when they started with my favorite song, “Horns of Baphomet,” I knew I was in for a great set. The sound was spot-on and the atmosphere was intense.

Terrorizer 

I caught a decent amount  of Terrorizer’s set, which was mostly their classic album World Downfall due to them not setting up on time. Their energy was unbeatable and they put on one of the best performances at the fest.

Candlemass

After Terrorizer I went to Ramshead for the rest of Candlemass’s set. Due to them also setting up late, they were playing “At the Gallows End,” my favorite song off of Nightfall, which they were doing in full.

I had seen them in 2014 and they were one of the best at the set’s at that fest. Here was no different. After they finished, the Nightfall set they played the two classics, ¨Mirror Mirror¨ and ¨Solitude¨ – a perfect way to end the night and the fest.

Harp House – Episode 18: The Short Guide to Purchasing Harmonicas at SPAH (and Everywhere Else)

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by Connor Frontera

With SPAH just around the corner, Connor breaks down the most common types of harmonicas and gives his tops picks from what’s available on the market today. Links to several of the models mentioned will be listed below!

Hohner Crossover: us.playhohner.com/instruments/harm…-band-crossover/

Hohner Rocket: us.playhohner.com/instruments/harm…ries/the-rocket/

Seydel 1847: www.seydel1847.de/epages/Seydel184…bProducts/16201C

Suzuki Manji: www.suzukimusic.com/harmonicas/m20/

Hohner Chromonica 270 / 280: us.playhohner.com/instruments/harm…uper-chromonica/

Seydel Saxony: www.seydel1847.de/epages/Seydel184…bProducts/52480C

Hohner Chord 48: us.playhohner.com/instruments/harm…hestra/chord-48/

Easttop Pocket Chord: www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_from=R…top+chord&_sacat=0

Suzuki Chord: www.suzukimusic.com/harmonicas/sch24-48/

Hohner Bass 58: us.playhohner.com/instruments/harm…/hohner-bass-58/

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