Tag Archives: Obituary

Kreator, Obituary, Midnight and Horrendous at Irving Plaza

Kreator was one of the first non-Big Four thrash bands I got into and had yet to see them. With a bill featuring Obituary, Midnight and Horrendous, I felt the time had finally come for me to see the teutonic thrash titans.

This show was a no-brainer as Obituary has always been a favorite of mine, Midnight is one of my favorite newer bands and Horrendous is pretty cool too. The day came and my friends Jay, Branden, Scott and I rode the bus to NYC. Jay and Scott went to the Blue Ruin for some drinks while Branden and I got some pizza before catching a cab to Irving. When we got there, Horrendous had started their set.

Horrendous

I was excited to finally see the old school death metal throwback Horrendous as I missed them at last year’s Maryland Deathfest. The band had great energy and made their long songs feel quick.

Midnight

Second band on was the almighty Midnight. Before they played I ran into my friends Jason and Nicole (the latter who wanted to see Midnight badly). After buying a Cause of Death shirt, Scott and Jay showed up. The band started with “Vomit Queens” so I knew I was in for a fun ride. The band had amazing energy and played many great tracks such as “Black Rock and Roll.”  No doubt about it, Midnight was the second best act of the night for sure.

Obituary

Next on were death metal classics Obituary. This was my third time seeing them, the first being at MDF 2015 and second being with Cannibal Corpse and Cryptopsy at this same venue. Although the band was really good both times, this set blew the others away because it was loaded with classics. “Internal Bleeding,” “Chopped in Half,” “Turned inside out,” “Slowly We Rot” and more hits from their catalog were featured. As always, the energy combined with a great setlist made them the best band of the night.

Kreator

In the ninth grade, the only thrash bands I knew were the Big Four, Sepultura and Suicidal Tendencies, my teacher(who also happened to be the singer for All Out War) recommended me a list of bands which included Kreator. After hearing “Betrayer” for the first time, I was hooked.

While I was glad to finally see Kreator, their set sort of bored me. They mostly played songs from the last two albums while throwing in some greats such as “Tormentor,” “Extreme Agression,” “Flag of Hate,” “Enemy of God” and “Pleasure to Kill.” I enjoyed them during these tracks while Jay only enjoyed them during “Pleasure to Kill,” “Tormentor” and “Flag of Hate” as he is only a fan of the first three albums. On the other hand, Branden loved every minute of the set as he loves their 2000 and onward stuff the most.

After Kreator finished, we left the building, got more pizza and hopped on the bus back to Middletown.

 

 

 

 

 

Bonesaw Podcast: Episode 51 – Gatecreeper’s Chase Mason

Chase Mason from Arizona’s Gatecreeper pops by to chat about the band’s album “Sonoran Deprevation,” the state of the music industry, and more.

Donate to our Patreon: www.patreon.com/thebonesaw.

My Experience at MDF 2015: Part 2 – Friday

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After resting Thursday night, the five of us (Josh, Nicole, Jason, Matt and I) ventured to the Edison Lot. We arrived an hour before the first band to look at merch.

At the Season of Mist tent I finally met Enrique, the labels PR in person (who thanks to my connections I’ve been able to conduct several interviews for the label’s artists). Before we knew it, 2pm started to roll around and it was time for the first band.

Artificial Brain 

Friday started with Long Island tech-death metal in the form of Artificial Brain. At the time I’d heard a lot of hype about this band but sadly, I didn’t get the hype. Artificial Brain was very technical but not in a fun way.

Funebrarum

After being bored by those damn Long Islanders, it was time for a slice of New Jersey  to take stage. I had seen these guys once before at MDF 2011. Like at that year’s fest, they killed.

Cianide

Old-school death metal dudes, Cianide where next. The band sounded decent but nothing too amazing.

Vallenfyre

These British death/doom greats were the first band on my Friday “must-see” list. I’ve loved their music ever since their 2011 debut “A Fragile King;” most likely due to the fact that they are an offshoot of Paradise Lost and sound similar as well.

The bands live performance was very impressive and they sounded great. I was extremely happy to hear my favorite Vallenfyre tracks “Splinters” and “Savages Arise” performed so well. After their set Jason and I rushed to Soundstage to catch another of my must-sees for the day.

Flagitious Idiosyncrasy in The Dilapitation

Jason and I got to the venue just as these adorable Japanese ladies were setting up.

Cute pictures and image aside, they are one of heaviest bands from Japan. The energy these girls brought on was intense. I caught up with my friend Nick and his girlfriend Cheyenne as we watched them put on one of the best performances of the whole fest.

Nekrofilth

We stayed at the Soundstage to see Nekrofilth. When they were added to the bill, I checked out some of their material and though it sounded decent. After watching them for about half an hour, I was kinda bored. Something about their set just felt off so Jason and I decided to leave for Edison.

Aura Noir

When we got to Edison Lot, Aura Noir still had about 20 minutes left in their set. I had seen these Norwegian blackened thrash greats once before at MDF 2011. Again, like last time they put on a fun live show. The day would only get better from here on.

Suffocation

Suffocation has always been one of my favorite death metal bands. Their 1995 album “Pierced from Within” is one of my top 10 albums of all time. Before this, it had also been five years since I’d last seen them so they were way over due for another encounter. Suffocation blew me away just like they did five years ago. Between their perfect performance and vocalist Frank Mullen’s jokes, this set blew teveryone in attendance away.

Obituary

These death metal pioneers had been on my “to see” list for quiet some time.When I finally did, I was not disappointed.

While not as energetic as Suffocation, Obituary still delivered with their signature dirty Florida Everglades sound. While they didn’t play “Chopped in Half” (the song that first got me into them), I still greatly enjoyed them.

Bloodbath

The last band of the Edison Lot classic death metal triple feature was Sweden’s Bloodbath.

Many fans worried about this set because Bloodbath’s new vocalist, Nick Holmes had turned off many fans, causing the new album to get mixed reactions. Personally, I didn’t have a problem with that album and the band played a good mixture of songs from their entire career.

Holmes told some pretty funny jokes including asking “if we were sick of death metal yet” (as if).

Bloodbath encored with their two most well known songs, “Eaten” and “Cry My Name” as well as a short cover of the Phantasm theme. After Bloodbath, Jason and I rushed over to sound stage.

Napalm Death

This was the last band Jason, Matt and I watched that night. I had seen Napalm Death earlier that year with Voivod, Exhumed and Iron Regan (That show was killer and I got to interview Barney Greenway in person! ).

The British grind giants opened with “The Silence is Deafening,” which was the first hint that this set list was going to be very different from last time.The band had tons of energy and I enjoyed this performance a lot more due to the venue having better sound.

After Napalm Death was done, Jason, Matt and I left for our hotels while Josh and Nicole watched Aeternus at Rams Head. After stopping at 7-11 for some snacks and running into a homeless, schizophrenic version of Bill Cosby we made it back to the hotel and called it a night.

Click here for part 3 (Saturday).

Cannibal Corpse Tear Down Irving Plaza

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After Killing Joke canceled their North American tour, I decided to look for another show to fill the void – and what better to fill it with than a lineup of Cannibal Corpse, Obituary, Cryptopsy and Abysmal Dawn? I had school until 3:45 p.m. last Tuesday and once it was over I raced from Newburgh to Middletown, got Wendy’s, picked up my friend Jay and then took the bus to New York City. We got there around 7:30 p.m. and made our way to Irving Plaza for a night of death metal.

Cryptopsy

Due to the bus dropping us off later than expected, we would not be able to catch Abysmal Dawn. Neither of us were fans so we chalked it up as an “oh well.” We got to the venue at around 8:15  p.m. – just in time for Cryptopsy. Due to the crowded audience I went up to the balcony and looked for a spot to watch the band. Out of the three bands we saw that night they were the only one I hadn’t seen before and was most anxious to see. Sure, the band doesn’t have Lord Worm anymore but they still sounded sick when playing classics like “Slit Your Guts” and “Phobophile.”

Obituary

After Cryptopsy finished I met up with my friend Branden at the merch table. We went to the top floor where Jay was and watched Obituary’s set from the screen. This was my second time seeing them, the first being at last years Maryland Deathfest. Like MDF, they didn’t play much classic material but still sounded great. Definitely a band that sounds better live than on the albums.

Cannibal Corpse

Last but not least were death metal heavyweights Cannibal Corpse. This was my fourth time seeing them and they never fail to impress. The band played a 13 song set covering all eras.” Scourge of Iron,” “I Cum Blood,” “Hammer Smashed Face,” “Devoured By Vermin” and many more classics were played. Oddly enough, they didn’t play “Fucked With A Knife” but after hearing it live three times it didn’t bother me. Like always, Corpsegrinder and company showed great energy and a sense of humor. After the show Branden, Jay and I left and took the bus back to Middletown.

David Bowie – Icon

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By William Kennedy

Legendary space oddity David Bowie died Sunday in Manhattan, NY after an 18 month battle with cancer.

Bowie was a global icon that contributed to music and fashion so much over the course of his 50-year career that his look, sound and theatrics became synonymous with pop culture. During his career, Bowie constantly redesigned his image and sound through the creation of several characters, most notably “Ziggy Stardust,” “Aladdin Sane” and “The Thin White Duke.” Bowie’s life was one of wild experimentation whether it was drugs, booze, musical genres or sexuality and was also unapologetically original (something that embodies the essence of the human spirit while still being such an alien concept to most).

“Space Oddity” was one of his earliest hits and was a fitting phrase to describe him as cosmic grace and originality made him seem like a visitor from another world. Bowie’s influence is something difficult to quantify as he inspired countless artists over his five decade career including Madonna, Lady Gaga, Marilyn Manson, Steven Wilson, The Killers and Radiohead (just to name a few).

Born David Jones in Brixton, London, England on January 8th 1947, the singer changed his name in the 60’s to avoid confusion with Davy Jones of The Monkees. In his lifetime, Bowie released 26 studio albums that ranged from pop, rock and alternative to new wave with electronic, funk and soul flairs.

Bowie had numerous collaborations with other artists throughout his career, working with The Rolling Stones’ Mick Jagger for the single “Dancing in the Street,” Queen’s Freddie Mercury for “Under Pressure,” John Lennon for “Fame” and Trent Reznor for a remix of “I’m afraid of Americans.” Bowie performed at the 1985 “Live Aid” concert to raise funds for an ongoing Ethiopian famine. In 1987, he performed in a divided Berlin where his track “Heroes” became an anthem for the tensions during the cold war. A lyrical selection from heroes is as follows:

“I can remember (I remember)
Standing, by the wall (by the wall)
And the guns, shot above our heads (over our heads)
And we kissed, as though nothing could fall (nothing could fall)
And the shame, was on the other side
Oh we can beat them, forever and ever
Then we could be heroes, just for one day”

When asked about the performance Bowie claimed, “It was one of the most emotional performances I’ve ever done. I was in tears.”

Shortly after, Bowie met Somali fashion supermodel Iman. They wed in 1992 and had their only child, Alexandria Zahra Jones in 2000. Both Bowie and Iman had children from previous marriages.

Bowie also pursued an acting career, appearing in such films as “The Man Who Fell to Earth (1976),” “Labyrinth (1986)” and “Basquiat (1996).” His music has appeared in countless movies and television shows to this day, some of which he had written for (such as a 2015 episode of “Mad Men,” in which he also performed).

Bowie was diagnosed with cancer of the liver in 2014. He released his final studio album “Blackstar” in 2016 on his 69th birthday. Two days later, the man known as “Ziggy Stardust” went to his cosmic paradise for the last time. Bowie is survived by his second wife, Iman Mohamed Abdulmajid, and children Duncan, and Alexandria Jones.